INSiGHT: PAL vs NTSC GameCube Cases

By Neil Flynn 06.09.2020 7

Ever wondered some of the differences between PAL and NTSC GameCube cases?

Watch Cubed3's Neil Flynn as he takes us through some of the subtle details between the two different regions! Let's see if you have noticed any of these differences before.

Check this out...


 
Have you learned anything new? Let us know in the comments below!

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Your guys cases are weird Smilie

Dragon0085 said:
Your guys cases are weird Smilie

Overall I prefer the US NTSC cases and dislike the Japanese cases. The PAL ones are ok, but I just don't like the disc holder as much!

Our member of the week

None of my PAL boxes had a disc holder button that was THAT hard to click. And none of my discs were ever damaged by them. On the other hand, on the few NTSC games I bought brand new, I was already afraid I'd break the disc in two pulling it out of the disc holder. I always preferred our system for the convenience factor. They kept this for Wii games in the PAL region actually and Japanese Wii games also have the same identical system, so that must be because it worked just fine.

(in fact it echoed nicely the system inside the gamecube disc tray itself where you press on the center piece itself and the disc pops out)

With that being said the GC game boxes themselves feel more sturdy in their NTSC form over PAL. The plastic used over here feels more flimsy, like it bends more easily. Say you left a box on the floor with a disc in it, for whatever reason, and accidentally stepped on it... I'd trust the NTSC box more to keep the disc safe over PAL, because our plastic is more bendy.

( Edited 08.09.2020 01:12 by RudyC3 )

Cubed3 Limited Staff :: Review and Feature Writer

The US boxes definitely feel much sturdier thats for sure!

I should say that none of my discs have ever knowingly been damaged by the box, I just get paranoid when clicking them back into the case that they would get damaged, mainly because of the noise when putting it back in!

Glad you guys watched the video! Was there anything in there that you didn't know before watching it?

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Flynnie said:
The US boxes definitely feel much sturdier thats for sure!

I should say that none of my discs have ever knowingly been damaged by the box, I just get paranoid when clicking them back into the case that they would get damaged, mainly because of the noise when putting it back in!

Glad you guys watched the video! Was there anything in there that you didn't know before watching it?


I knew about all that already but that was still great to reflect back on all that.

The coloured triangle thing on the spine of European games is a NOE coding system by the way. It just identifies which languages this specific copy of the game is meant for sale in. Other colours include magenta for all French packaging, purplish blue for German, orange for "Multi" where the box usually sports German, French, English and others still. Green is typically found only in the UK. This coding still exists to this day even on Switch boxes. My copy of Beyond Good and Evil for example had French and Dutch on the disc and the box and manual were also exclusively in those two languages. The English and Spanish coupling for you guys can be explained, I think, by the fact that in North America only those two languages were on the disc, which makes a lot more sense for them being that it was released For Canada, the US and... Mexico.

Ah yeah about the Game Boy player startup disc box, I bought it new and there wasn't a manual in the disc box, it came in the bigger box that housed the peripheral itself. The disc box only has a folder with ads for late generarion GC games and on the flipside, an ad for Metroid Prime Hunters (I guess my unit dates from as late as 2005).

Cubed3 Limited Staff :: Review and Feature Writer

I always found the coloured triangles on Nintendo game boxes strange, because it has always been commonly misunderstood or unexplained just what they mean. You have to do a bit of researching to figure it out, and I'm not sure if Nintendo ever put actual answers out there on official websites or anything to help explain it. So it always seemed like a fairly pointless thing that benefited very few customers when buying a game. Who ever looked for the correctly coloured triangle to ensure a game had the languages they preferred? Not just that, but it just plain looks ugly haha.

RudyC3 said:

Flynnie said:
The US boxes definitely feel much sturdier thats for sure!

I should say that none of my discs have ever knowingly been damaged by the box, I just get paranoid when clicking them back into the case that they would get damaged, mainly because of the noise when putting it back in!

Glad you guys watched the video! Was there anything in there that you didn't know before watching it?


I knew about all that already but that was still great to reflect back on all that.

The coloured triangle thing on the spine of European games is a NOE coding system by the way. It just identifies which languages this specific copy of the game is meant for sale in. Other colours include magenta for all French packaging, purplish blue for German, orange for "Multi" where the box usually sports German, French, English and others still. Green is typically found only in the UK. This coding still exists to this day even on Switch boxes. My copy of Beyond Good and Evil for example had French and Dutch on the disc and the box and manual were also exclusively in those two languages. The English and Spanish coupling for you guys can be explained, I think, by the fact that in North America only those two languages were on the disc, which makes a lot more sense for them being that it was released For Canada, the US and... Mexico.

Ah yeah about the Game Boy player startup disc box, I bought it new and there wasn't a manual in the disc box, it came in the bigger box that housed the peripheral itself. The disc box only has a folder with ads for late generarion GC games and on the flipside, an ad for Metroid Prime Hunters (I guess my unit dates from as late as 2005).


Yea I guess I was going down the route of how Az was thinking, in that it wasn't so apparent to the consumers who would benefit from such a coding of game boxes. I guess also being in the UK we were less likely to see international languages. I have to admit it has  put me off buying copies of certain games before, often prefering to opt for the UK box if I can. Obviously not that snobby if it is a game that I've been searching long and hard for though!

My Gameboy player has barely been utilised really, but it is still a nifty gadget to have. The older I've got the more I've shifted over to prefering to play handheld gaming which is funny really as it was something I never really did as a kid. I think the 3DS is what swayed me, and I play my Switch in handheld mode almost all of the time!

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