The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword (Wii) Second Opinion Review

By Jordan Hurst 20.05.2016 8

Review for The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Wii

The Legend of Zelda is possibly the most consistently high-quality franchise out there - quite a feat, considering it has 18 main series games as of this writing. Even Four Swords Adventures, the obvious nostalgia cash-in of the series, still turned out to be loads of creative, frenetic multiplayer fun, so the series has yet to have a truly bad game to its name. All that said, though, Skyward Sword is one of the worst additions to the Zelda family. Again, that doesn't make it a bad game - it's got fantastic puzzles and some smart decisions that fix some of the previous titles' faults - but for every smart decision, there's an idiotic one. The good elements are thoroughly diluted by hours of padding, and the extensive use of motion control is...inconsistent, to say the least.

By this point, the series is kind of in love with itself. The number of visual, structural, and narrative cues this game is taking from the rest of the series is ridiculous, even compared to Twilight Princess, which was 40 hours of the developers reminding everybody that they also made Ocarina of Time. This almost narcissistic quality is most apparent in the art style, which was explicitly stated to be a compromise between those of The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess, but doesn't reflect the strong traits of either. It only takes its colour palette from The Wind Waker and ditches the stylisation, while similarly taking the scale of Twilight Princess' art, but removing the detail (and keeping the hilariously ugly NPC designs, for some reason). The end result looks bright and clean, but also kind of bland and empty, like a middling children's cartoon.

Similarly, the overworld is akin to The Wind Waker's vast, free-roaming ocean, except with a single, densely-populated city at its centre, much like Clock Town from Majora's Mask. Here, however, both of these elements are boiled down to their most basic, literal descriptions, without any of the nuance that made their inspirations compelling. The Wind Waker's Great Sea wasn't the most exciting place, but it was at least atmospheric and encouraged exploration. Skyward Sword has you flying around the sky amid some floating rocks with no purpose until you find their corresponding object on the surface. This makes exploration, and by extension, the whole concept of a large, open world, pointless. The town fares better, in that it's at least more interesting than the between-dungeon commute that is the sky, but again, the charm of Clock Town was in the organic, intertwined schedules of its citizens. The new town, Skyloft, on the other hand, functions on a binary day/night system, and its side-quests become available at completely arbitrary times, such as a character deciding to give a girl a love letter because Link completed the Earth Temple.

Screenshot for The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Wii

The actual meat of the gameplay takes place in three provinces of the surface world, each with its own subareas and dungeons. At first, the unconnected world is disappointing, but the structure turns out to be a positive point. Each area feels like a strong, self-contained level where puzzles, combat, and NPC interactions are woven together seamlessly, rather than the usual dialogue-driven intermission between combat sections. It helps that both the provinces and the dungeons feature some of the best level design in existence. Particular highlights are a pair of dungeons containing crystals that, when activated, send the immediate area centuries into the past - and the Ancient Cistern, which, through nothing but atmosphere and creative structure, is right up there with Ocarina of Time's Forest Temple as one of the best dungeons in the series. The main reason these dungeons work so well is that most of them are small and focus on one central puzzle, so they never overstay their welcome or become too confusing to navigate. Additionally, while each province will be revisited a few times, there are enough new subareas and changes to existing ones that it never feels like retreading old ground.

Actually, there are quite a lot of intelligent and obviously deliberate design choices to be found here. The most important is that the game is actually quite challenging. One of the biggest problems with recent Zeldas was that they were insultingly easy, and with Skyward Sword, Nintendo apparently realised how much this drained the tension out of boss fights and the like. In addition to the obvious fixes (don't make enemies pathetically weak, and don't drop instant-heal fairies on Link's head every other step), the game also finds a way to make money a valuable resource for the first time since the original NES release. First, the shield is very important to the new combat system, but it will also break if used carelessly. Second, healing items appear more rarely now, so healing potions are more important than usual. Finally, both shields and potions take up slots in the inventory, and, of course, shields, potions, and additional inventory space are all acquired with money. So for the first time in 24 years, you'll actually be happy when you open a chest and find 50 Rupees.

All of this makes some of the less inspired choices noticeably out of place. In particular, the new sidekick character, Fi, comes with a new mechanic called Dowsing. It boils down to slowly looking around an area until the game announces the correct direction. It's tedious and unnecessary, and it makes you do it all the bloody time. In fact, fetch quests make up a disproportionate number of the out-of-dungeon activities, to the point where players are likely to be completely burned out on them when it comes time for side-quest completion. It's also worth elaborating on Fi, because she is, without question, the worst support character in the entire series. Her specialties are calculating pointless probabilities and stating the obvious. Be prepared for numerous frustrating situations where pressing a switch shows a machine activating, only to have Fi pop up and say, "I have calculated that there is a 90% chance that pressing this switch activated that machine." This also happens all the bloody time. Say what you will about the fairy companions from the N64 games; at least they never repeatedly interrupted gameplay to laboriously declare that the Wii Remote batteries were dying.

Screenshot for The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Wii

Fi isn't the only one with a verbal diarrhoea problem, either. For the first quarter of the game, characters just don't shut up. Zelda games usually have an hour-long introduction, but they've gone overboard here. Most of the gameplay up to and even a little past the first dungeon is nothing but Dowsing and fetch quests, which doesn't help, but the worst part is that none of the redundant, patronising dialogue has any payoff. Skyward Sword just doesn't seem to understand foreshadowing; when four different characters state that Link and his pet bird have a special bond, that fact is expected to mean something past the first two hours of the game. Otherwise, why should we care? The story as a whole is kind of a mixed bag. Skyward Sword was heavily promoted as the first game in the Zelda timeline, and it does an adequate job of explaining the origins of the Master Sword and Ganon. Aside from being an origin story, the plot's mainly there to drive the gameplay, which is a policy I respect to a point, but when Link is asked to do a menial task to "prove his courage" for the 12th time, my patience wears a little thin. The final hours also feature the most unnecessary time travel plot since the first Final Fantasy.

Now, to the elephant in the room: the motion controls. Skyward Sword tries really hard to make the Wii Remote relevant again, and it succeeds...partially. The game makes for some of the best use of the Wii MotionPlus available. The new sword-fighting system works spectacularly - 1:1 movement involving aggressive sword swings just feels good - and the many, many different ways that enemies, bosses, and even puzzles are designed to accommodate a wide variety of techniques is really impressive. Enemies intelligently block imprecise attacks, thrust attacks are required for targeting weak points, and some setups, like an enemy with three moving heads that must all be killed with one slash, are refreshingly creative. Outside of the sword controls, however, problems arise. The biggest one is the usual problem with motion controls: they don't work for everything. Repeatedly jerking the controller to the side to climb a ladder more quickly is always going to be an immersion-breaking gimmick, and it's disappointing that Nintendo hasn't realised this yet. Similarly, the flying controls are moronic; tilting the controller to adjust pitch and yaw is fine, but snapping it back to simulate wings flapping is the only way to gain speed. Somehow, none of the developers realised that flicking the controller also tilts it, making it impossible to fly in a straight line, ever.

Screenshot for The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Wii

The weirdest thing about the controls, though, is that they don't use the Wii Remote's optical sensor at all. Everything, including aiming and menu selection, is done using Wii MotionPlus. It's actually a really great idea; it prevents the pointer from being blocked by objects, it prevents awkward periods of looking at the sky while trying to centre the crosshair, and it just streamlines the process overall. Unfortunately, it comes with an important flaw: without the sensor bar, the Wii Remote can't tell which direction is "forward," so it has to treat its initial position as such. If the initial position happens to be angled oddly, the player receives a lovely wrist cramp as they twist the Remote into the necessary position. This comes up a lot more than just during aiming. Flying, swimming, and using items all get this same treatment. There's a button to reset the position, which works alright, but that's not a whole lot better than the standard practice of just moving the cursor to the centre of the screen, is it?

However, one of the most respectable things about Skyward Sword is that unlike most Wii games, it doesn't just rest on its motion controls as its sole source of innovation. Some of its new features have been touched on already, but there are also a couple of new items - most notably the Beetle, a remote-controlled device capable of performing all sorts of neat tasks once released. There's also the semi-new Whip and Mogma Mitts, which are reinventions of The Wind Waker's Grappling Hook and The Minish Cap's Mole Mitts, with some new abilities. Additionally, potions can now be infused with caught insects for additional effects. Of course, no Zelda review would be complete without mentioning the game's soundtrack, and Skyward Sword's lives up to the legacy of the series, skilfully jumping between catchy and atmospheric for different areas. It also one of the best implementations of a technique that Zelda games have been excelling at recently, where more instruments or different arrangements will fade in and out depending on the player's actions. The sound effects are excellent, too, though it may be time for voice acting to enter the series, if only to speed up those long dialogue sections.

Screenshot for The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword on Wii

Cubed3 Rating

6/10
Rated 6 out of 10

Good

In conclusion, Skyward Sword is an extremely conflicting game. On the one hand, it's had some real thought put into it, it's got lots of Zelda hallmarks for fans to enjoy, and it's a long, MotionPlus-fuelled adventure that'll get some decent playtime out of the Wii, a console known for suffocating under layers of dust for long periods. Unfortunately, it showcases the flaws of motion control as much as the benefits, a lot of that playtime is unnecessarily padded by travel time and fetch quests, and many players will find themselves wishing they could turn their sword on Fi. Again, it's still a Zelda game, so it's worth checking out. Just don't raise your expectations too high.

Developer

Nintendo

Publisher

Nintendo

Genre

Adventure

Players

1

C3 Score

Rated $score out of 10  10/10

Reader Score

Rated $score out of 10  9/10 (28 Votes)

European release date Out now   North America release date Out now   Japan release date Out now   Australian release date Out now   

Comments

This pretty much conflicts with my opinion of the game. I absolutely loved Skyward Sword, the 1:1 motion controls introduced even more puzzles into the mix, boiling down to the fact that even enemies themselves were mini puzzles. I found it to be an engaging and enjoyable experience. I seriously need to replay it at some point!

Also, I actually kinda liked Fi. If you look past all the usual nonsense such as the in-game tutorial, she's a pretty loyal companion and will do all she can to aid Link in his quest. I found her departure at the ending to be quite emotional, tbh. Maybe that's just me!

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Guest 21.05.2016#2

My favourite 3D Zelda, ace controls, best dungeons in the series, best characters in the series. Story and soundtrack were also pretty great.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Guest 21.05.2016#3

Glad I wasn't the only one reading that review thinking I'd played a completely different game. Loved Skyward Sword from beginning to end. It was such a massive step up from Twilight Princess.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Twilight Princess, which was 40 hours of the developers reminding everybody that they also made Ocarina of Time.
Yes. TP is overrated and too much of an Ocarina clone for its own good.

It's also worth elaborating on Fi, because she is, without question, the worst support character in the entire series.

many players will find themselves wishing they could turn their sword on Fi.
Yes and yes. Crappiest companion in the series. That she got a place in Hyrule Warriors is mad.

Similarly, the flying controls are moronic
Yup. My worst memory is that flying whale boss battle, Levias, where you had to charge into specific spots on his body, or something. I died an ungodly amount of times and vividly remember cursing the hell out of it. Truly awful. And that's not getting into the recurring Imprisoned boss battle. What the hell were they thinking?

it may be time for voice acting to enter the series, if only to speed up those long dialogue sections.
Absolutely. Why people say no to this, I don't know. Link won't talk; just others. Even then, it doesn't need to be for every single line of text. Not all games feature full line-for-line voice acting. Perhaps the worry is that voices/accents won't fit to the game or people's imaginations of what a Zelda cast should sound like, which is fair enough. I don't think Zelda needs truly strong VA, though; it's a fantasy world with light-hearted elements and quirky characters. Whacky and cliché voices will go with most characters. Depends on the style and tone they go with for the setting/story.

The padding is also unreal in this game. This really needs sorting and going back to its roots in the next Zelda.

The point of bad decisions for every smart one is spot on. It's not a bad game; just a bad Zelda game. For all the bravery and clever level designs and boss battles, there are equally some awful elements that make it extremely difficult to play through. It becomes a huge slog to see to the end. It's the only 3D Zelda I've never felt the urge to replay, which says a huge amount. I would like to give it another playthrough one day, but that desire is still not there.

Great review. Definitely encapsulates exactly how I feel about it.

Ironically, I actually like Twilight Princess a lot. It gets a lot of "clone" flak, but I feel like the horseback combat, wolf abilities/sections, and new equipment more than set it apart. I just couldn't resist getting a dig at it as a point of comparison for how self-referential Skyward Sword is.

Guest said:
My favourite 3D Zelda, ace controls, best dungeons in the series, best characters in the series. Story and soundtrack were also pretty great.

Some of the best dungeons for sure. Characters were a mixed bag; on the one hand, you have Groose and Ghirahim, on the other, you have Fi and the "let's push Link off a cliff for a laugh" incarnation of Zelda.
Azuardo said:
And that's not getting into the recurring Imprisoned boss battle. What the hell were they thinking?

Oh God, The Imprisoned. Probably the worst 3D boss in the series, and you have to do it, what, three times?
The padding is also unreal in this game. This really needs sorting and going back to its roots in the next Zelda.

This is a huge improvement I've noticed with A Link Between Worlds. It's much more immediate, and the fast-travel system is super efficient.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Excellent review, basically agree with pretty much everything you said about it.

Even from the very first moment I saw Skyward Sword, I was very under whelmed by it. Not just because of the bad stage demo, but it just looked so bland and unexciting. The feeling I got from the new Zelda reveal was the complete opposite, same for TP and same for Wind Waker.

There's not much good things I can say about the game. I liked some of the bosses, there's very few music tracks I liked, I liked the motion controls once, which was the Koloktos boss and it actually felt satisfying to use there. That's about it. Oh, I liked that Link could run!

The main reason I didn't like it above anything else was the unnecessary padding to the story. This was the biggest problem, because I found the game not fun and pretty bland overall, so it just made it even more painful to finish.

To be honest, there's so many things I dislike about it, but I've talked about it in-depth so much before, that I just can't be bothered any more. So here's a bullet point list:

- Wasn't a fan of the visual style

- Wasn't into the majority of the music, only like a couple of tracks

- Bad pacing and unnecessary padding to the story

- Didn't like the motion controls in the majority of the game

- Fi was the most bland support character ever in a Zelda game.

- The Imprisoned was horrible and made even worse by having to do it 3 times. Again, unnecessary padding and not fun.

- The overwold/underworld was one of the worst ever. I still find this insane how bad it was. Tiny little rocks in the sky with nothing on them and then the underworld was sectioned off and had no exploration feeling. Even then it was so generic, Forest, Lava, Desert. The most generic areas you could pick.

- Throwing and rolling bombs was awful.

- The entire game just felt very sterile to me, in a bad way.

- Then there was robotic Link. For whatever reason, he felt more robtic to control in this game than previous titles. I think Wind Waker was the best. Anyway, coming off playing Uncharted, playing Skyward Sword felt super dated. They need to make Link control more fluently, like an actual human. You have to be so precise with everything and it just feels odd to me and not fun to play.

- Also, I do think the lack of voice acting does make these games feel like they're lacking. I mean, I'm fine with reading text still. It doesn't ruin the game, but replaying TP again in 2016, it just seems so odd to see the character moving their lips and nothing is coming out. Just a little sound at the beginning of sentences. I do feel it would just add to the overall experience.

Anyway, so hyped for the new Zelda! To the future!

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Characters were a mixed bag; on the one hand, you have Groose and Ghirahim, on the other, you have Fi and the "let's push Link off a cliff for a laugh" incarnation of Zelda.
I could never really like Groose as much as everyone else did. Ghirahim the same. It was great to see more personality to Zelda here, but that push off the cliff lol... Yeah.

I do agree with the time travel stuff. As the first game in the series' timeline, was that necessary?


This is a huge improvement I've noticed with A Link Between Worlds. It's much more immediate, and the fast-travel system is super efficient.
Absolutely. This is one of the things I loved about ALBW - no pissing about; just straight into the action and letting you do what you want. There was no bullshit. It's exactly the same with OoT. I regained a newfound love for it when I played OoT 3D in the last couple of years, reminding why it's such a fantastic game. The story was there, but it was unobtrusive, and the pacing was just about perfect. You spend about the same amount of time between each dungeon, and it really isn't long before you're in one.

I've mentioned elsewhere here, but this is what Zelda needs to get back to being great again - less padding and bringing the main game down to a 15-20 hour one, instead of a padded 40-hour one. When you look at both the soul/tear collecting in TP and SS, it's clear Nintendo thinks making a Zelda game longer is the way to make Zelda games good. Thankfully, after ALBW, I've got hope that they've seen what needs to be done, and it's just a case of transferring that into 3D Zelda, now.


Throwing and rolling bombs was awful.
Yup. Dear lord, this was awful. Swimming, as well.

Then there was robotic Link.
lol I've made the Uncharted comparison countless times here... Doesn't make it any less true, mind. Running up a wall for the fifth time in a row because you're a pixel out of line with a ladder is just asking for smashed controllers.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Marzy said:

- Wasn't a fan of the visual style

I quite liked the water colour style they went for, it was really just to play up the lack of power in the Wii. Although, I feel the visual style actually shines more when it's upscaled in Dolphin, would love to play it like that.

- Wasn't into the majority of the music, only like a couple of tracks

I'd say that there were less memorable tracks in the game, but that's not to say the music was bad. Given this being an orchestrated soundtrack, a lot of the music was more atmospheric and I think it played well with the atmosphere.

- Bad pacing and unnecessary padding to the story

I kind of agree with this, but there's been a couple of Zelda games like that. Wind Waker to an extent, with the Triforce Shard fetch quest and fighting earlier bosses again. Never had a problem with this, just an example I'm throwing out there. I loved Wind Waker.

- Didn't like the motion controls in the majority of the game

Well, the controls are a personal preference. Personally I felt they added a whole new layer of puzzles to the game.

- Fi was the most bland support character ever in a Zelda game.

If you look past the usual tutorial stuff, she's not as bad as she appears, at least in my opinion. Her and Link have that master and servant bond, which later disappears as Link starts seeing her as more of a friend than a servant. Make of it what you will, but Fi was pretty much on par with Navi, just with less of the "Hey Listen" and more about probabilities. Maybe the probability thing was overused, I understand that.

- The Imprisoned was horrible and made even worse by having to do it 3 times. Again, unnecessary padding and not fun.

Understandable, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't have fun slicing away at his marshmallow toes!

- The overwold/underworld was one of the worst ever. I still find this insane how bad it was. Tiny little rocks in the sky with nothing on them and then the underworld was sectioned off and had no exploration feeling. Even then it was so generic, Forest, Lava, Desert. The most generic areas you could pick.

Whilst there was no Hyrule Field or Great Sea, the environments that were included were pretty much huge dungeons within themselves, which is something I quite liked about it. Also, don't pull the generic card. It's a running theme for Zelda games to have Forest, Lava and Desert temples. Which gets me on to the dungeon designs: Even if generic themes were present -- like most Zelda games -- I feel that Skyward Sword had some of the best designs in a 3D Zelda title. Lanayru Mining Facility, Ancient Cistern and Sandship all come to mind.

- Throwing and rolling bombs was awful.

Can't really remember this, but I do remember playing bomb bowling with certain enemies.

- Then there was robotic Link. For whatever reason, he felt more robtic to control in this game than previous titles. I think Wind Waker was the best. Anyway, coming off playing Uncharted, playing Skyward Sword felt super dated. They need to make Link control more fluently, like an actual human. You have to be so precise with everything and it just feels odd to me and not fun to play.

Never played the Uncharted games, so I can't really comment on movement much, but I didn't have a problem with Link's movements. Felt like any other Zelda game to me.

- Also, I do think the lack of voice acting does make these games feel like they're lacking. I mean, I'm fine with reading text still. It doesn't ruin the game, but replaying TP again in 2016, it just seems so odd to see the character moving their lips and nothing is coming out. Just a little sound at the beginning of sentences. I do feel it would just add to the overall experience.

I'll probably get blasted for this, but I hate the whole "Zelda needs voice acting" debate. It doesn't need voice acting, at all. There was a couple of scenes in Skyward Sword which were emotional and it was really the music accompanying the words of characters that made it so. Would Zelda games benefit from voice acting? I mean, maybe... but I still think it isn't NEEDED. I don't mind the lack of voices, it allows us to be imaginative and create voices for those characters in our head.

Anyone's ideal voice for a certain character may not be the same as another person's, voice acting would just polarise the Zelda fanbase even more than it already is.

Anyway, so hyped for the new Zelda! To the future!

Amen to that brother.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

Oh man, I forgot about bomb bowling. Most of the motion control problems stemmed from stupid setups (flying), but bomb bowling just straight-up did not work.

I may be instinctively comparing the visual style to those of WW and TP, which is a little unfair. There's nothing wrong with the style on its own merits, it's just boring compared to the spectacle of previous games.

Mush said:
I'd say that there were less memorable tracks in the game, but that's not to say the music was bad. Given this being an orchestrated soundtrack, a lot of the music was more atmospheric and I think it played well with the atmosphere.

I agree with this. It was a different kind of soundtrack, but it worked well.
I kind of agree with this, but there's been a couple of Zelda games like that. Wind Waker to an extent, with the Triforce Shard fetch quest and fighting earlier bosses again. Never had a problem with this, just an example I'm throwing out there. I loved Wind Waker.

Yeah, but the Triforce Shard search was the worst part of Wind Waker. It only took about 5% of the running time and there was nothing nearly that bad elsewhere. Skyward Sword's padding and pacing problems are ubiquitous and slightly front-loaded, making it harder to get into.
If you look past the usual tutorial stuff, she's not as bad as she appears, at least in my opinion. Her and Link have that master and servant bond, which later disappears as Link starts seeing her as more of a friend than a servant. Make of it what you will, but Fi was pretty much on par with Navi, just with less of the "Hey Listen" and more about probabilities. Maybe the probability thing was overused, I understand that.

I think the difference is that the "Hey Listen" thing is just a sound that doesn't take up any time unless you press the button and...well, listen. Fi forces you to read her every inane line of dialogue.
Azuardo said: 
I could never really like Groose as much as everyone else did. Ghirahim the same. It was great to see more personality to Zelda here, but that push off the cliff lol... Yeah.

Aside from being funny, I think a big part of Groose's popularity is that he has actual character development, which the series is not known for. Closest it's come before was Tetra in Wind Waker, which was less character development and more character deflation.
I do agree with the time travel stuff. As the first game in the series' timeline, was that necessary?

It's too bad that Nintendo abandoned the idea of remaking the first two games in favour of the Oracle titles. They could have retconned away a lot of inconsistencies with the timeline that way.
Marzy said: 
- The entire game just felt very sterile to me, in a bad way.

Sterile is the perfect word for it. Previous games felt like a fantasy created by people. Skyward Sword feels like a fantasy created by a computer.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

I agree that its one of the weakest Zelda games in the franchise

I hated the motion controls, they turned certain moments in the game into pure frustration. They were great at first for fighting various monsters who reacted differently but after a while when I knew what way to take out the different monsters I just felt like i was just going through the motions and felt like more of an annoyance. I down right hated the motion controls when it came to fighting the bosses. They often required quick reflexes and half of the time my swings were read properly, so id swing a wrong may through no fault of my own. It's the first time I've felt I've died unfairly in a Zelda game. I hated motion control implementation in the flying sections too. 

I was also not a fan of the art style, it was pretty bland and detracted from the dark parts of the story. It's bright and colourful, yet you're supposed to take the foreboding nature of the story seriously. 

I wasn't a fan of the overly structured, compact world either. I like to explore and feel like I'm finding new places. I just felt like I'd seen all those places before and what I could do there was heavily controlled to the point of only being able to do one thing.

There are so many other things about Skyward Sword that I didn't like too, which in my opinion make it one of the weakest but I still enjoyed the game over-all.

( Edited 13.07.2017 18:26 by Guest )

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