Cubed3 Nintendo gaming, Wii and DS

Pokémon Black / White (Nintendo DS) Review

Review for Pokémon Black / White on Nintendo DS - on Nintendo Wii U, 3DS games review

Where can the Pokémon series go? After all, developer Game Freak had no long-term plans to continue the monster collecting adventure series, only extending its lifespan due to extraordinary demand. Being put in a position where suddenly fresh ideas are required from minds that had already put something to bed is an awkward one to say the least. What is better, radicalising the whole process to keep the role-playing title fresh, new and relevant in order to capture a new generation, or playing it safe with minor modifications over a long period of time as each new entry arrives so that older fans are not upset or potentially alienated? It could very well be argued that Pokémon Black / White highlights how Game Freak has definitely taken the latter route.

For those still catching up on the series, Pokémon Black / White are the fifth main entries into the franchise that began back in the days of the humble Game Boy with Pokémon Red / Blue. What was initially thought to be a mere quirky Japanese role-playing game fad here in the Western world is actually still going stronger than ever as one of the biggest franchises in gaming. In fact, since launching in Japan late last year, the latest duo has already passed the five million mark, putting them on-track to eventually reach the dizzy heights of the originals, with the hype huge going into the US and Europe March release dates. Why exactly should we all be excited, though?

As we enter the 15th year since Pocket Monsters first graced Japan, being able to find someone who has never heard of the games, cartoon show, movies, or even just that little electric mouse, Pikachu, is becoming increasingly difficult. Levels of recognition have almost hit Mario and Mickey Mouse standards. It is because of this that the development team has continued its efforts all these years, rather than hanging up the brand name much earlier, as it had originally planned.

When the initial promotional images and information came to the fore about Pokémon Black / White, it focused on new elements to be found within the RPG monster-collecting adventure. However, the basic elements of Pokémon have not changed at all - something that long-term fans will be overjoyed about, yet those that thought the formula was growing stale will use as a reason to once more avoid this and wait to see what appears on the Nintendo 3DS. The mantra of 'Gotta Catch 'Em All' still applies despite the motto being sidelined in recent years, with three youngsters (one of whom the player controls, the other two being Cheren and Bianca, Pokémon trainers from your hometown) setting off on a perilous journey to traverse the world on a mission of discovery, growth and monster capturing. There are some plot deviations along the way that aim to hook players, such as the inclusion of the Pokémon-liberating Team Plasma, yet there is nothing in the story to really draw people in as in other Japanese RPGs, meaning that if monster catching and battling is not your cup of tea, then cease reading now as the level of depth to the tale is minimal to say the least.


 

Nominal story elements aside, though, the graphics are also an area where there has barely been any upgrade, giving the game a retro charm but continuing the disappointing tradition of not taking full advantage of the hardware upon which it is released. The battles harbour some improvement, with each Pokémon finally animated as the fights go on. The animations unfortunately don’t stretch to characters moving body parts to execute or react to moves - creating unique visuals for each would be a big ask in 2D, considering the amount of moves and monsters there now are - but as the attacks get flashier and visual touches such as the Pokémon’s Abilities flashing on-screen begin to slip in, it’s clear that it livens the battles up. On the other hand, the ‘dynamic’ camera, zooming and sliding about after a few seconds of inactivity, doesn’t add much to proceedings. There is the odd smidgen of 'magic’ elsewhere, such as the gorgeous animated introductory sequence and some half-decent 3D environments, but with the calibre of other RPGs available on DS nowadays, Pokémon Black / White suffers in the visual stakes considerably.

That may come across as unfairly negative to some, especially given the fact that certain other games will be praised for their links to the glory days of the 1990s. The difference there is that some developers choose a basic appearance on purpose for effect, whilst Game Freak appears to have gone down the route of providing the tiniest update possible. However, judging a book by its cover is a foolhardy practice and what Pokémon Black / White may lack in the visual stakes, it more than makes up for in the all-important areas of pure gameplay, depth of adventuring and wealth of added content for after-play.

Screenshot for Pokémon Black / White on Nintendo DS - on Nintendo Wii U, 3DS games review

At the beginning of the journey, after meeting up with Professor Juniper in your home town, there is the chance to choose what path the lead character will take, with the traditional option of a starter Pokémon from the fire, water or grass origins (Tepig, Oshawott and Snivy, respectively). There is no enforcement to stick with this choice through the entirety of the adventure, though, since along the way there are 156 new Pokémon to find (bringing the grand total for the series to 649 now), meaning that should you feel rather restricted by the initial line-up, the suffering does not necessarily have to stretch out for a long time.

In terms of the general format of the adventure, it comes in the template of wandering around different residential townscapes in the region of Unova (a land that is very different to past regions Kanto, Johto, Hoenn and Sinnoh, and is based on real life locations around the USA, including New York, mixing rural landscapes with bustling city locales, and even a desert section), chatting with locals, finding out new information about various tasks related to the storyline, and taking on numerous different Gym Leaders to gain experience over the course of the exploration mission, as well as uncovering the true intentions of Team Plasma (a far more serious replacement for the wacky, bumbling Team Rocket) and their plans to ‘liberate’ Pokémon everywhere. Players have no instant access to any of the previous 493 Pokémon from earlier games, with them only becoming available for transfer long after growing accustomed to the new line-up of cute, ugly, weird, and very varied critters that have been thought up for this Fifth Generation. The decision to only allow the use of new Pokémon until the game’s completion means that, despite the lack of change in formula, the journey through Pokémon Black / White feels quite new and full of discovery, recalling the first titles.

As for the fighting and collecting element, Pokémon Black / White continues the traditional turn-based mechanic, whereby the player’s trainer will send out one of the six Pokémon that can be carried at any one time to spar with an opposing trainer’s monsters to simply defeat them. When battling Pokémon in the wild, though, the aim then changes to reducing their energy to extremely low levels and throwing out a Pokéball to grab it for storage in your collection, the Pokédex - or just besting them for experience, of course.

Screenshot for Pokémon Black / White on Nintendo DS - on Nintendo Wii U, 3DS games review

The random encounter feature of many RPGs can definitely grate, and it is no different in this edition of Pokémon, yet thankfully battles are speedier than ever, which is a massive benefit for players wanting to build up the experience of their monster collection quickly. Mixed with the considerable amount of unavoidable battles against trainers found around the region, as well as against your two friends from the start of the adventure, there is definitely no shortage of fighting, which makes the swiftness of most battles a blessing.

Random battles only tend to occur when walking through grass, rather than on the main path, and Game Freak has decided to throw in some new ideas to keep things fresh. First up, some sections of terrain will move - patches of grass that shake, splashes of water, small fountains of dirt. These tiles are wildcards that sometimes contain items, but always have Pokémon hiding inside waiting for a duel, and more often than not they are monsters that cannot be found otherwise. There are also parts of the route that contain regular grass and others with taller, darker grass, with the former holding normal battles, and the latter normally having stronger Pokémon awaiting, as well as a higher probability of being thrown into a Double Battle, fighting against two wild Pokémon at the same time.

Not content with giving players the thrill of two-on-two battles, there are now ‘Triple’ and ‘Rotation’ versions. Whilst ‘Triple’ may infer an simple extension of the ‘Double,’ there is the small matter of positioning playing a large factor in how battles are carried out. Whilst in a Double Battle your Pokémon can attack either opposing creature, this new style restricts attacks based on position, with those on the left only able to strike each other, and so on. In a normal one-on-one fight, when changing Pokémon it means the user loses a turn to switch-in/switch-out, and this is where battles of a Rotation variety are handy, since three Pokémon are sent out into the field at the same time, meaning you can switch between any of these three to conduct the one-on-one fight without losing a turn.

There are plenty of other differences to help Pokémon Black / White stand above its predecessors, such as the inclusion of a season system, which changes from Spring to Summer, Autumn to Winter, all depending on the current real-life month (January is Spring, February is Summer, March is Autumn, and so on). Therefore, since the game selects the season based on your DS clock, manipulating months is very simple, granting access not only to the aesthetic changes that reflect the generalised weather type associated with a particular season, but actual amendments to the story. For instance, certain areas can only be accessed when snow has built up to create a crossway. Additionally, whilst the main set of Pokémon can be found and caught in any season, the locations where certain wild Pokémon will appear can alter.

Screenshot for Pokémon Black / White on Nintendo DS - on Nintendo Wii U, 3DS games review

After reaching certain levels or fulfilling other criteria, your collection of Pocket Monsters will start to evolve. This is a process that can actually be stopped if you prefer, with different defensive/offensive abilities opening up dependent on personal preference. In general, though, as Pokémon develop, they pick up new skills automatically, with the player making the tough decision as to which final four powers a Pokémon will keep. This choice is made even more difficult when it comes to considering attributes linked with some moves as having a well-rounded monster is important to take on all-comers. Another matter to consider is the TMs, the Technical Machines that can teach new moves to your creatures, which are no longer single-use and can be used again and again - a hugely welcome move - and HMs (Hidden Machines, that can also be used repeatedly on many Pokémon) that are found or earned along the way. There are only six of the latter type - Cut, Strength, Fly, Surf, Waterfall, Dive - and, thankfully, they are used more for side-quests than the main story now, alleviating some of the pressure in the decision process and meaning that you no longer have sacrifice a team slot in order to carry around a ‘HM donkey’ to continue.

On top of the pleasingly lengthy main story, and post-game adventuring that can continue as long as you like, there are plenty of other extras that can be accessed via accessing Nintendo’s Wi-Fi Connection, or simply using the local wireless ability of a DS system. On the title screen there are the following options: Game Sync, Battle Competition, and Mystery Gift. Game Sync connects to the Internet to provide the owner with a special code that can be entered on the Global Link website, which is a portal for all sorts of Pokémon fun. The Battle Competition mode requires registration via Global Link in order to take part in Wi-Fi battles against random people across the world, without the need for Friend Codes, plus a Ranked Match online option for a more structured approach to worldwide battling. The online Dream World website expands even further once a save game has been uploaded: there are mini-games, a house to decorate, special berries that can only be grown there, exclusive abilities to add to your Pokémon line-up, and the chance to catch unique Pokémon to send back to your game. There are also Mystery Gifts that can be obtained through online downloading, and these will open up new opportunities in the game itself for players to reach new areas, obtain special Pokémon, and so on.

Then there is the in-game feature, C-Gear, which when turned on keeps the game constantly hooked up to the Internet, searching using the local wireless network, and even looking out for Infra-red connections thanks to the cartridge’s in-built IR functionality - a massive improvement when you want a quick local battle, as you can swiftly hook-up through IR rather than traipse to a Pokémon Centre (though if you want in-depth battle options, the Pokémon Centre’s Union Room is still the place to go). C-Gear gives players access to quick online battles and local wireless Pokémon trades, but also offers the ‘Entralink’ ability that allows for people to locally enter each other’s game and complete certain missions to gain special benefits. Another great addition is the ‘Xtransceiver’ for the DSi / DSi XL / 3DS, where two (online) or four (locally) people can enter video chat using the systems’ microphone and internal camera. Other online features, such as the Global Trade System, have also been improved. Now players can negotiate trades with others over the system, as well as still being able to specify a desired creature as before, and can do so from any Pokémon Centre rather than the sole location in the Fourth Generation titles.

As well as the major differences between the actual two games (alternative Gym Leaders to battle, and differing areas to visit in each version), Nintendo and Game Freak have well and truly created what many will deem to be the best entry in the Pokémon franchise so far. Unfortunately, whilst the new features help bump up the quality overall, there are still several factors holding it back, mainly in the presentation stakes. It can only be hoped that a true revolution in gameplay appears in the inevitable Nintendo 3DS edition, along with revamped sound and visuals to take full advantage of the hardware improvements. For now, though, long-term Pokémon fans will adore Pokémon Black / White and those who may have started to lose interest in the same formula being regurgitated could well be drawn back in thanks to the positive changes and online additions.

Screenshot for Pokémon Black / White on Nintendo DS- on Nintendo Wii U, 3DS games review

Gameplay

Between the tweaked gameplay of old, plus the new features to expand upon both the adventuring and monster catching side, as well as additions to the battling mechanic, Game Freak has made this the pinnacle of the long-running series.

Graphics

Definitely a marked improvement over past editions, but compared to the quality of other RPGs on the DS so far, there is simply not enough of an upgrade.

Sound

Trademark old Game Boy sound effects are disappointingly still present, yet favourite tunes from past entries are back in remade format. However, the entire soundtrack lacks sufficient quality to match the level of the main adventure itself.

Value

A massive journey spanning eight Gym Leader battles, eighteen main routes to battle through in the region of Unova, a whole host of post-game adventure content, special events, extra challenges, as well as the trading aspects make this probably the most comprehensive DS game released so far.

Cubed3 Rating

9/10
Rated 9 out of 10

Exceptional - Gold Award

About this score
Rated 9 out of 10

Game Freak has worked its socks off to ensure that Pokémon Black / White not only live up to the standards set by past entries in the mainline series, but have included a wealth of extra content to entice newcomers to the world of Pocket Monsters. Whilst the presentation side still has the series living behind the times, this is definitely a step in the right direction. Grab your Pokéballs, it is time to ‘Catch ‘Em All’ once more.

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06.03.2011

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Developer

Game Freak

Publisher

Nintendo

C3 Score

Rated $score out of 10  9/10

Reader Score

Rated $score out of 10  9/10 (51 Votes)

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Reader comments - add yours today Comments on this Review

There are no replies to this review yet. Why not be the first?

Totally agree about the music, I doubt they'll ever top the classics!

Great review

If you like LOST and videogames, or really just videogames Check out my Blog

I'm usually 1 generation behind with PKMN games. So this is a great time to start my Diamond! Smilie

Senior ModeratorStaff Member

I don't think it's fair to dismiss the story in that way, it's quite a ways deeper than what we're used to in the series, with characters who actually have development and different relationships with each other.

As for music I also disagree, the classics are simple and yeah they're very good, but some tracks in recent gens are brilliant, I'd say Gen4's OST is definitely better than that of the first two Gens. That said I generally think Gen5's is the weakest Pokémon soundtrack in a few Gens.

Either way good review! Glad to see everyone's enjoying it.

Twitter | C3 Writer/Moderator | Backloggery

I dunno, team plasma's battle theme is amazing

Senior ModeratorStaff Member

welshwuff said:
I dunno, team plasma's battle theme is amazing

That I agree with - easily one of the standouts.

I'm not totally against the soundtrack as such, but compared to what I've been playing lately (Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story & Radiant Historia - both Yoko Shimomura, and Inazuma Eleven - Yasunori Mitsuda) it pales into insignificance.

The main bugbear for me was the sound effects - they've barely changed at all. How hard would it be to NOT have a thud noise every time you walk into something, or update the old Game Boy Pokémon noises?! Smilie

SuperLink said:
I don't think it's fair to dismiss the story in that way, it's quite a ways deeper than what we're used to in the series, with characters who actually have development and different relationships with each other.

Come on, you just justified why I dismissed it like I did. Saying it's only picking up on key RPG traits after 15 years goes to show how little focus there has been on the story over the years. Starting to put a tiny bit of effort into developing characters is nothing special. Later the story expands slightly, but can't talk about that in the review (under embargo until late March for EU journos). Anyway, even when it expands I found it lacking compared to the light-hearted fun of Inazuma Eleven, the hilarious Mario & Luigi, and the amazing story and writing style of Radiant Historia (that game is SO good - I'm sure Kafei will agree).

The story and average presentation were factors in holding it back from a 10...

As for music I also disagree, the classics are simple and yeah they're very good, but some tracks in recent gens are brilliant, I'd say Gen4's OST is definitely better than that of the first two Gens. That said I generally think Gen5's is the weakest Pokémon soundtrack in a few Gens.

You say you disagree, but then admit it's one of the weakest Pokémon soundtracks...?! Smilie

Haha Smilie

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter

I just realized something too, it's a new Beginning, that's why they choose colors again. Red and Blue was the beginning in the Japanese related areas, White and Black will be the beginning in the western areas.

When all is bad don't look for a easy way out. Because you wont know what to do once your out

I really like the soundtrack and think it's almost as good as the Hoenn soundtrack which is my fave. SO yeah, I'd give the soundtrack a 9. Agree with the old gameboy sounds though.

1.Hoenn
2.Unova
3.Kanto
4.Johto/Sinnoh

Compared to other soundtracks, I think the pokemon games hold up very well. I think it's problem are the light-storylines so you don't gain as big an emotional attachment as you do other RPGs.

( Edited 06.03.2011 18:59 by Ifrit XXII )

Senior ModeratorStaff Member

jesusraz said:

You say you disagree, but then admit it's one of the weakest Pokémon soundtracks...?! Smilie

Haha Smilie


I disagree because you said it wasn't as good as the classics, I find it better then Gen1's tracks, which if they were made today wouldn't be all that great and there really isn't much substance to them either. The greatest soundtracks imo are Gens 3 and 4, and I dunno if you'd consider those "classics"

As for the sound effects, I'd like the Pokémon to be updated too but at the same time it's nice that they've stayed the same I dunno.
And the bumping sound has to stay omg. Otherwise they'd just take it out and in 10 years everyone would be like "hay make a Retro Pokémon game!" and they'd party when they heard the sound attack.
Why take it out at all?

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Senior ModeratorStaff Member

Ifrit XXII said:
Compared to other soundtracks, I think the pokemon games hold up very well. I think it's problem are the light-storylines so you don't gain as big an emotional attachment as you do other RPGs.

That may well be the case, to be honest. It could also be because the music from other games I've been playing on DS is so damn fantastic ( Mitsuda <3 Shimomura <3 Smilie ) that Black/White didn't have a chance.

SuperLink said:
I disagree because you said it wasn't as good as the classics

Okay, must be some misunderstanding here. I had NO idea what you were on about until I just checked the sound section. That's been edited by Mike. My original line said:

"Trademark old Game Boy sound effects are present, along with favourite tunes from past entries, yet on the whole the new tracks are not a patch on the standard set by the main game itself."

It's not that I feel the classics are better, it's just I think the soundtrack overall is poor and doesn't do justice to the fantastic main game. The adventure itself deserves a far better score. Don't get me wrong, I like the music (hence the '7'), but just feel it isn't on the same level as the main game itself.

As for the sound effects, I'd like the Pokémon to be updated too but at the same time it's nice that they've stayed the same I dunno.

Anyone coming into the game completely fresh will find a massive disparity between the 'new feel' and the odd noises Pokémon make. DEFINITELY needs changing, IMO.

And the bumping sound has to stay omg. Otherwise they'd just take it out and in 10 years everyone would be like "hay make a Retro Pokémon game!" and they'd party when they heard the sound attack. Why take it out at all?

Smilie Joke, right? Hard to pick up on sarcasm at times on the Internet.

It's like in Radiant Historia - the developer has gone for a really retro feel and the sound effects are REALLY old school, including such a bloody annoying footstep sound that is just like a typewriter or horse shoes clip-clopping quickly. Driving me nuts.

( Edited 06.03.2011 19:53 by jesusraz )

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

jesusraz said:

Smilie Joke, right? Hard to pick up on sarcasm at times on the Internet.

It's like in Radiant Historia - the developer has gone for a really retro feel and the sound effects are REALLY old school, including such a bloody annoying footstep sound that is just like a typewriter or horse shoes clip-clopping quickly. Driving me nuts.


Partly joking, I just don't really see the problem with the bump noise, they'd only end up replacing it with something equally "annoying" anyway.

Twitter | C3 Writer/Moderator | Backloggery
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

Get rid of it completely? Really no need for it...made me try to avoid touching ANYTHING all the way through, haha!

EDIT: One major thing I totally forgot to mention, and something I seriously loved, is how when you check a TV, you can LEARN JAPANESE PHRASES!!! Smilie Fantastic addition - kudos to Game Freak.

( Edited 06.03.2011 21:34 by jesusraz )

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter
adhd (guest) 07.03.2011 07:06#12

i just started im not sure?

By "bumping noise" are you guys talking about the collision detection sound? Getting rid of that is an absolutely terrible idea. Anyone who has bred for shinies will tell you this. If I'm going to hop on my bike and ride it up and down a single route four thousand times, it's nice to be able to do other things like read a book or watch TV, and this is made possible by that little bump happening when I hit a wall at either end of the route.

Not only that, but let's face it: the series still runs on grid-based controls, and they aren't always the most accurate. There's nothing more annoying than setting your eye on getting somewhere, looking away from the screen for a minute to talk to someone or do whatever, and looking back and finding out you're stuck on a wall or a bush or some asshole who stepped into your path and then decided to just stand there. Emitting a sound when the player character bumps into something is a great way around this.

NNID: crackedthesky
My blog, mostly about writing: http://davidjlovato.wordpress.com
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

Wow, that's really something I'd never considered before, mainly because I never do anything like that in any RPG. Surely that can't be the reason why the developer keeps it in...

Do other readers rely on the collision detection thud like justonesp00lturn does?

You do raise a very interesting issue, by the way, in the form of the controls being very clunky. Yet another reason why despite the upgrades, Black/White still feels rather antiquated at times.

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter

Yeah, I do the same thing when it comes to breeding. One hand on the D-pad cycling up and down, can concentrate on something else while doing it. Smilie

jesusraz said:
Wow, that's really something I'd never considered before, mainly because I never do anything like that in any RPG. Surely that can't be the reason why the developer keeps it in...

Do other readers rely on the collision detection thud like justonesp00lturn does?

You do raise a very interesting issue, by the way, in the form of the controls being very clunky. Yet another reason why despite the upgrades, Black/White still feels rather antiquated at times.

I'm not going to outright say the grid system is a bad thing... it's different, in a world that has moved on from it. Still, with the advent of the 3DS, I think top-down RPGs are going to become an endangered species, but I think Pokemon will remain one of the few on that front, and I think the grid-based control system sort of helps to lock that idea down. It's also another good thing for breeding... only thing worse than getting stuck on that tree I mentioned earlier is getting stuck on a tree 50 miles west of where you were initially headed Smilie

NNID: crackedthesky
My blog, mostly about writing: http://davidjlovato.wordpress.com
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

Are most people picking up White or Black? I see that White alone has become the second-fastest selling DS game in the UK (behind Pandora's Box), but I wondered what the consensus was amongst C3 readers.

Mason said:
Yeah, I do the same thing when it comes to breeding. One hand on the D-pad cycling up and down, can concentrate on something else while doing it. Smilie

Okay, okay - I concede, keep the annoying thud noise in there Smilie

justonesp00lturn said:
I'm not going to outright say the grid system is a bad thing... it's different, in a world that has moved on from it. Still, with the advent of the 3DS, I think top-down RPGs are going to become an endangered species, but I think Pokemon will remain one of the few on that front, and I think the grid-based control system sort of helps to lock that idea down. It's also another good thing for breeding... only thing worse than getting stuck on that tree I mentioned earlier is getting stuck on a tree 50 miles west of where you were initially headed Smilie

Smilie I think you *might* have to change your play style if they ever change the four-way movement approach!

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter

jesusraz said:
Are most people picking up White or Black? I see that White alone has become the second-fastest selling DS game in the UK (behind Pandora's Box), but I wondered what the consensus was amongst C3 readers.

Okay, okay - I concede, keep the annoying thud noise in there Smilie
Smilie I think you *might* have to change your play style if they ever change the four-way movement approach!

I have White, my sister got Black.

Haha, I blame my living room setup. We have a tv for games and movies in one cornor of the sitting room, and a TV for cable across in the corner of the next room, with the couch between the two, so it's easy to get distracted from games xD
And the noise is unbearable, too.

NNID: crackedthesky
My blog, mostly about writing: http://davidjlovato.wordpress.com
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

How many hours have players sunk into this so far?

It's amazing to see how Black/White has broken records in Europe and the US, whilst the duo are still trucking along nicely in Japan.

Anyone been using the video chat function on the DSi / DSi XL as well?

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter

How many hours have players sunk into this so far?

I've had it for just over a week and I've put in around 22 hours. I only just got the 6th gym badge yesterday and I'm sure I still have plenty to see and do. I'm taking my time though.

I've known some people to complete it in a weekend, which shocked me.



( Edited 13.03.2011 20:44 by Marzy )

Marzy said:
How many hours have players sunk into this so far?

I've had it for just over a week and I've put in around 22 hours. I only just got the 6th gym badge yesterday and I'm sure I still have plenty to see and do. I'm taking my time though.

I've known some people to complete it in a weekend, which shocked me.



I've done exactly this, haha. Got it a week ago, put in about 22 hours, six badges, still a hell of a lot to do. Just got surf, heard rumours of a legendary pokemon in some cave that needs Surf to traverse, for instance.

NNID: crackedthesky
My blog, mostly about writing: http://davidjlovato.wordpress.com
Senior ModeratorStaff Member

Marzy said:
I've had it for just over a week and I've put in around 22 hours. I only just got the 6th gym badge yesterday and I'm sure I still have plenty to see and do. I'm taking my time though.

I've known some people to complete it in a weekend, which shocked me.


By the time I'd finished the third gym, I was 15 hours in. I agree with the 'take your time approach' and don't quite understand why certain people rush through to complete it asap. It's not a race Smilie

Adam Riley < Operations Director :: Senior Editor :: Cubed3 Limited >
Word of Adam | Voice123 Profile | AdamC3 on Twitter

I'm on 58 hours, at the seventh gym...Smilie

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